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aliens now. there have been promises of a u.s. visit program, an entry exit system to track everyone entering into the country to make sure they exit in time. that was first promised back in 1986, ten years later, 1996, congress passed another act to require a fully integrated entry-exit system and full implementation by 2005. guess what, madam president, 2005 has come and gone, it's been 30 years since that initial promise was made. we still don't have an operational effective u.s. visit system. madam president, my colleague from alabama mentioned another glaring example, the fence, the secure fence act. in 2006 we actually passed it in legislation. the secure fence act of 2006 promised to achieve operational control of the entire border. operational control the entire border. and it defind operational control. quote, "the prevention of unlawful entries into the united states including entries by terrorists, unlawful aliens, instruments of terrorism, narcotics and other droon band" -- close quote. well, we clearly haven't achieved that. in fact, we're so far from that goal, d.h.s. h
: this is "the new york times" from february 20th. budget cuts seen as risk to growth in the u.s. economy. the cuts, most likely would reduce growth by 1 1/2 of a percentage point in 2013, according to a range of government and private forecasters. that could be enough though to again slow the arrival of a recovery, producing instead another year of sluggish growth and high unemployment. >> guest: well i guess if you take it from "the new york times" perspective you could make that argument because i think they see already a slowing in growth happening and this makes a convenient fall person for bad public policy been in place under four years of obama administration. we have slowed growth. it has been very stagnant. there are a lot of reasons for it. there are a lot of friction points put in place in our economy that need to be fixed. until we get our confess and the president of the united states to work together and begin to remove those friction points we'll continue have slow growth. if you look at a same slide you had up a moment ago ago, shows the sequester on the right hand of tha
creative research. if you look at u.s. manufacturing, capital stock which is a reflection of basically how many machines, including 3-d printers, machines defined -- defined broadly, pretty much that used to grow every decade in america on the order of 25-55% a decade. our technology stock in manufacturing was doubled it in the 2000s it was zero essentially. which has never again happen in our history. the u.s. companies were not investing in automation initiatives. and secondly, we have this in her recent book, if you look at the share of corporate r&d as applied, excuse because basic, applied in development, we are the only industrial nation where the share of the corporate share in basic and applied to shrink in the last decade. every other country is expand their basic and applied for u.s. companies to the opposite. they expanded their development although that is flattened and their shrank. largely that's really, really risky, and shareholders are saying we really don't care about returned. and seven years we want returns next you. any other component of that is when you have the 27th
commander of u.s. forces in iraq general loy austin to lead the command which is responsible for operations of middle east and afghanistan. general austin was joined by u.s. command nominee general david rodriguez who is a top commander in afghanistan from 2007 to 2011. this hearing is chaired by carl levin of michigan. it is two hours. >> good morning everybody and welcome this morning that committee considers the nomination of two very distinguished officers to the two of the most active and challenging combatant commands. general lloyd austin united states army nominated to the commander u.s. central command, and general david rodriquez, u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. fees' to combat and commands, centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for the military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. both nominees have served the country with distinction, and i want to faint each of you for your decades of military service and a willingness to serve once again. i and stand general austin's life and rodriguez's life are with us this morning.
certainly regards israel as a true and natural u.s. ally." in another quote, he said, "i know hagel personally. i think he believes in the relationship and the natural partnership between israel and the united states." here is an israeli patriot who has spent a great deal of time devoted to the relationship with the united states of israel who understand, in his words, and concludes that chuck hagel regards israel as a true and natural u.s. ally and will act accordingly. he is a dedicated patriot. he is an individual who has served this country in so many different ways and i support his nomination, urge my colleagues to do the same. i think, too, it's important to state that this nomination, as we've done with every secretary of defense for decades, deserves an up-or-down vote on the floor of the united states senate. people may choose to cast a vote against him for many reasons. that's the prerogative of a senator. but i strongly believe that if we want to stay true to the traditions of this body and to the presumption that the president should be at least allowed to have his nomi
's number-one priority will be taking care of our troops. he is a veterans' advocate with the u.s.o. and he's won the respect and admiration of veterans' groups, in addition he's won the support of an extraordinary array of former secretaries of defense, ambassadors and diplomats, senior retired military leaders and in particular, two former members of this body who appeared with him at his testimony, former senators warren and nunn. i believe that chuck hagel is the right man for the challenges, the fiscal challenges that will confront the department of defense. put aside sequester, which i dearly hope will not happen, secretary panetta said it would be irresponsible for the congress to allow it to happen. many of us agree, it must be avoided. but apart from that challenge in the next month, or series of months, the long-term outlook for the department of defense is that it must do more with less, and secretary hagel, if he is confirmed, will have that management task, and he is one of the people in this country who is almost uniquely qualified to carry it out. and i believe that he will w
's with 93% of employers not using the program. outdated examples of e-verify errors. a u.s. citizen in tennessee actually receive an error notice from her employer. she went to the social security administration office to fix it. she thinks she fixes it at social security, but e-verify generates another error and she gets fired. another example, a u.s. citizen experienced an error because an employer made a simple mistake when they were typing the employee's social security number into the system. again, that worker went to a social security office, couldn't resolve the error there, e-verify generated a final nonconfirmation and the worker got fired. the most disturbing piece of all this is that for workers who lose their jobs because of an e-verify error, there's no formal process in place for them to get the jobs back and that's a problem for thousands of workers who experience these errors because you can imagine, these problems are only going to grow exponentially if we mandate the program. given these concerns, we have recommendations for how to move forward. first, congress ne
when needed. the fiscal outlook which the u.s. army faces in fiscal year '13 is dire and to my knowledge unprecedented. in addition to the $180 billion. the combination of the continuing resolution a shortfall -- excuse me, the shortfall in oversays contingency operation funds for afghanistan and the sequester and fiscal year 2013 has resulted in a 17 to $18 billion shortfall to the army's operation and maintenance accounts. as well as an additional $6 billion to other programs. all of this will come in remaining seven months of this year. the fiscal year 2013 fiscal situation -- impact on all forces not serving in afghanistan or forward in korea. impacts which will have a significant impact to fiscal year 2014 and beyond. just a few of the acts we will be forced to take, are for example, we will curtail training for 80% of ground forces. this will impact our unit's basic warfighting skills and shortfall across critical specialty including aviation, intelligence, engineering, and even our ability to recruit soldiers in to our army. we have directed an immediate army hard wiring
a central psychological or political space in the u.s., russian relationship. i don't think that's true where russia is. further on, that was on page one of the report. then it says this about bilateral and nuclear arms negotiations on page 16. >> would you forgive the interruption? i think i'm able to set a time for a vote now if we can get some idea about how long you want to speak him and i'm not trying to limit you. can you give us an idea about how long? i just talked to senator blumenthal and i want to ask senator hirono the same question. >> i just want to share a few thoughts spent know, is five minutes enough? >> seven. >> that's no problem. senatosenator hirono, how long t you speak? senator blumenthal? i'm now going to schedule a vote for 5:00. you about at five. we will hopefully have just about everybody there. if not, if somebody's on their way we can stay here until everybody has an opportunity either to vote in person or vote by proxy. senator sessions, so 5:00 we will start the vote. senator sessions, forgive the interruption. >> let me ask one question, mr. chair. ther
. their record -- lousy, persistent, double-digit unemployment and negative economic growth. the u.s. unemployment rate of 7.9% which is actually even higher than my home state is for sure too high, but it is far better than the rate of 26% unemployment in spain and greece, the record of 16% unemployment in portugal. our 2.3% growth rate may seem inadequate and it is, but as we recover from the deepest recession we've seen since the great depression, it is much better than the negative growth rates in the countries that took the austerity path. the results are clear -- the evidence is in from the austerity experiments. the countries that cut the deepest have hurt the most. if we want to continue growing our economy and creating jobs, we need to resist the european path that is championed by republican austerity advocates. we need to maintain the balanced approach that has brought the u.s. economy up out of recession. admittedly not fast enough, but look at what the alternative has been. leader reid's bill would replace the indiscriminate cuts of the so-called sequester with targeted
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10